History of Beachborough Park



Beachborough Park House 



Beachborough in the parish of Newington, seat of the Rev. William Brockman, M.A. is situated in a park of varied picturesque scenery. The south front of the mansion has two wings; the portico is supported by four fluted pillars of freestone; the vertical dial in the centre bears the date 1813. The interior is spacious and elegant; in the collection of paintings are our saviour, on copper, considered very excellent; artist unknown: and a portrait of Sir William Brockman, the celebrated defender of Maidstone, against the attack of General Fairfax, in 1648. The grounds surrounding the mansion are very beautiful, particularly on the south, and between the east front and the road where they abound with luxuriant shrubs, and sheltered by majestic cedars. Northward of the house the park terminates in an abrupt declivity, and to the westward is a hill of a globular form as seen from the north and south, but exhibiting a different shape on the east; upon the summit of which is an elegant summer - house, commanding an extensive and varied panoramic view of the surrounding scenery, comprehending in its circle, a part of the continental coast. Beachborough is distant from Folkestone rather more than four miles north - west, from Dover about 11 miles, from Hythe, two and a half miles north, and 67 miles from London.


Beachborough anciently Bilsborough formerly belonged to the family of Valoigns with whom it remained till the daughter of Waretius de Valognes, at her father's death, in the reign of Edward III, entitled her husband, Sir Francis Fogge, to the possession of it. In his descendants it continued till the end of Elizabeth's reign, when George Fogge, Esq, of Brabourne, sold it to Mr. Henry Brockman, (a younger son of the Brockman's, of Witham Essex), who most probably rebuilt the seat. His descendant, Sir William Brockman, greatly signalized himself in defending the town of Maidstone, in 1648, against General Fairfax. From him this estate descended to James Brockman, Esq, who dying unmarried in 1767, and being the last male heir of this family, bequeathed it to the Rev. Ralph Drake, with an injunction for him to take the name and arms of Brockman. Beachborough Park House was also once the preparatory school for Stowe College, the Army during World War II and Prime Minister David Lloyd - George who also lived here in the early 20th century. Steeped in history there is a timeless quality to Beachborough Park, with a feeling of relaxation.

Source: Epitome of the History of Kent By C. Greenwood 1838




The Brockman family at Beachborough, Temple lake (Top Lake) (1744-46), with temple in right foreground (some of which remains today and will be shown at a latter date). Painted with oil on canvas by Edward Haytley an English active (1740-61), and held in the National Gallery of Victoria.



The Brockman family at Beachborough, Temple lake (Top Lake) (1744-46), with temple in the distance at left. Painted with oil on canvas by Edward Haytley an English active (1740-61), and held in the National Gallery of Victoria.

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